Tuesday, January 27, 2015
   
Text Size
Education

Education

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Thursday, 01 April 2010 10:07

Classroom Activities

 

  • Lesson One: Our Unique Atmosphere
  • Lesson Two: Emissions of Heat-Trapping Gasses
  • Lesson Three: Communities of Living Things
  • Lesson Four: Implications of Warming the Arctic
  • Lesson Five: Regional Effects of Global Warming
  • Lesson Six: What Now?

 

Use the preview below to look inside the Activities (a sample only):

Get your copy of the Will Steger Foundation Educator Resource Binder
Tuesday, 30 March 2010 15:43

What Now? - Template for Action

GW101 What Now?Action Resources and a collection of hands-on activities linked to the Grades 3-12 Lesson Plans.

Tuesday, 30 March 2010 15:42

Global Warming 101 Expedition Supplements

Global Warming 101 Lesson Plans Expedition SupplementsView exciting educational video footage, audio footage, and written journal entries from Will Steger and partner expeditions to the Polar Regions, documenting the impact of global warming on the Arctic environment. Expeditions are linked to lesson plans for grades 3-12 and activities via the Educator Resources index.

Read More...

Friday, 26 March 2010 11:48

Climate Change Basics

Climate Change BasicsDriven by a commitment to solutions, the Will Steger Foundation provides information on climate change basics, giving educators and learners background knowledge to work towards slowing climate change.

Categories:

 

Friday, 29 January 2010 16:53

Adventure Learning Guide

The following resources can be used to supplement the existing Will Steger Foundation Curriculum. Resources include links to external sites that contain helpful related information and activities, and clips from the Will Steger Foundation video and audio archives that can be connected with specific lesson plan topics.

Thursday, 06 March 2008 11:35

Scientists: Overview

Fanhitch

icon_discussion icon_lessonplans icon_action icon_moreresources icon_moreresources
Discussion
Starters
Lesson
Plans
Action! More
Resources
Adventure
Learning

Scientists: Profiles

acc_Achim_BeylichAchim A. Beylich
acc_brenda_hallBrenda Hall
icon_mouse_rubyDr. John S. Kimball
acc_Maarten_Loonen3Dr. Maarten J.J.E. Loonen
acc_Steve_ZackSteve Zack
acc_simon_beltSimon Belt

Another word for “scientist” is investigator. Scientists look at the world and find gaps in our understanding of how things work and they design investigations to try to figure out the answers to questions. The results of every experiment and the data from every project are like pieces in a puzzle; the more pieces we get the better our understanding.

The polar regions interest scientists because nowhere on earth is the climate is changing more dramatically or more rapidly. Melting polar ice caps and surging glaciers can impact global climate and ocean circulation and raise sea levels. Melting permafrost can release stored carbon. Many birds and other animals migrate to the Arctic during its summer to feed and raise their young. Arctic peoples live close to the land and sense its changes. Scientists want to investigate these and other questions related to the polar regions.

The settlements in the High Arctic are home to many scientific projects. Resolute, on the south coast of Cornwallis Island is the base for the Polar Continental Shelf Project and home to a weather station. Eureka, on Ellesmere Island, operates a weather station that researches the ozone layer, weather, northern lights, long-range transport of pollutants, and climate change. At the northern tip of Ellesmere Island, Alert, the most northerly permanent settlement in the world, scientists study air chemistry, ozone, air pollution and weather. The Global Warming 101 expedition visited some of these communities. Read up on what the expedition discovered here.

The international scientific community declared March 2007 to March 2009 the International Polar Year and will be focusing efforts on investigating the atmosphere, ice, land, oceans, people and space. The IPY needs youth and young scientists to help in this global effort. Visit www.ipy.org/ to find out more about ongoing projects.

Questions:
  • What do you want to know about the climate in your home region?
  • How could you investigate your questions?
Tuesday, 22 April 2008 16:36

Arctic Explorers: Overview

Modern Explorers

willmap.jpg

icon_discussion icon_lessonplans icon_action icon_moreresources icon_moreresources
Discussion
Starters
Lesson
Plans
Action! More
Resources
Adventure
Learning

In 1995 explorer Will Steger left Siberia, crossed the frozen Arctic Ocean over the North Pole and arrived at northern Canada’s Ward Hunt ice shelf, the largest ice sheet in the Arctic. An ice shelf is a glacier that extends out over the ocean, floating on the surface of the water. Early explorer Robert Peary first recorded observations of the Ward Hunt ice sheet in the early 1900s. By comparing Peary’s records to modern observations, Steger knew that the ice sheet had been shrinking. In 2002 the Ward Hunt ice sheet broke apart. Steger and other explorers witness these changes and help draw public attention to the changing climate of the polar regions.

Steger’s 2008 expedition to the High Arctic will focus attention on the remnants of Ellesmere Island’s Ayles ice shelf which broke apart in 2005. Pieces of what was once the Ayles ice shelf are now floating down the coast of Ellesmere Island.

Modern Explorer Profiles

Richard Weber Lonnie Dupre Börge Ousland Anne Bancroft Paul Schurke Will Steger
Richard
Weber
Lonnie
Dupre
Börge
Ousland
Anne
Bancroft
Paul
Schurke
Will
Steger


Young Explorers

team_02.jpg

icon_discussion icon_lessonplans icon_action icon_moreresources Adventure Learning
Discussion
Starters
Lesson
Plans
Action! More
Resources
Adventure
Learning

A new generation of polar explorers is emerging. Six of these young people are accompanying Will Steger on his Global Warming 101 expedition to Ellesmere Island in the Canadian high Arctic. Meet these young explorers and follow their expedition.

Young Explorer Profiles

icon_discussion icon_lessonplans icon_action icon_moreresources
Tobias
Thorleifsson
Ben
Horton
Sigrid
Ekran
Sam
Branson

 


Historic Explorers

historic_nl_04.jpg

icon_discussion icon_action icon_moreresources icon_moreresources
Discussion
Starters
Action! More
Resources
Adventure
Learning

Some early expeditions were successful in reaching the High Arctic. The first explorers’ confidence in western methods and the technology of the day, however, did not prepare them for the harsh Arctic conditions.

Questions:

  1. When you explore your home region, what do you discover?
  2. When you read historical records of the climate in your home or talk with elder members of your community, what changes do you find?
  3. How can you share your discoveries with others?
Page 10 of 20